ESSAYS: 

“A Bridge Between Two Worlds: The Political and Economic Geography of SNCC’s Friends Network,” Current Research in Digital History, volume 3 (2020), https://doi.org/10.31835/crdh.2020.01

Abstract:

“A Bridge Between Two Worlds” combines geographic data on the locations of SNCC Projects and Friends of SNCC Chapters with 1960 census data on poverty levels, the racial characteristics of population, per capita income, and median family income to visualize the political and economic significance of SNCC’s national organizing. The spatial analysis reveals the strategic geography of SNCC’s national fundraising network.

“A Different Story: The Geography of Narrative during the 1964 Freedom Summer”  *UNDERDEVELOPMENT 

Abstract:

“A Different Story” combines geographic data on the home locations of Freedom Summer volunteers with 1960 census data on poverty levels, the racial characteristics of population, per capita income, and median family income to visualize the demographic geography of Freedom Summer volunteer letter homes. When contextualized with a map  of state and local newspapers, the spatial analysis reveals the strategic geography of SNCC’s storytelling (reporting and volunteers’ letter writing) during the 1964 summer project.


“A Radical Civic Education: The Protest Geography of Freedom Summer Alumni” *UNDERDEVELOPMENT

Abstract:

“A Radical Civic Education” combines geographic data on the university affiliations of SNCC fieldworkers and volunteers with 1960 census data on literacy to visualize the educational geography of the 1964 Freedom Summer. When contextualized with the post-summer activism of volunteers, the spatial analysis reveals the strategic geography of SNCC’s Freedom School model of education.


“Deep Maps and Deep Learning: The Digital Turn and Expanding the Pedagogical Lens of Student Activism and Social Protest in the 1960s” *UNDERDEVELOPMENT

Abstract: 

“Deep Maps and Deep Learning” links SNCC’s model of education to new modes of digital and civic pedagogies. Utilizing the digital maps associated with The Tree of Protest, this essay offers a set of frameworks to expand how we teach the civil rights movement, student protest, and the 1960s.